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Posts Tagged "GPS leap seconds"

One of the major issues in testing GNSS receivers designed for use with multiple satellite systems is that the different systems do not necessarily share the exact same time-bases. And while the differences may be tiny, time is such a critical quantity in satellite navigation that even microsecond differences can create large accuracy errors. The problem is a legacy of the GPS system, which has used its own time-base (GPS time) since it began in the early 1980s, rather than the globally accepte...

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One of the more surprising consequences from the March 2011 earthquake in Japan was that the forces unleashed shifted the earth's mass sufficiently to accelerate its rotation, shortening each day by no less than 1.8 microseconds, according to calculations by NASA. And while such effects are clearly imperceptible to humans, their cumulative effect on GNSS timekeeping would cause significant inaccuracies that would be unacceptable to any GNSS application. Each GNSS will deal with the time variati...

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Time is an important component of any satellite navigation system, and it is essential that any receiver attached to the system has a clock that is fully up to date. The current GPS system uses its own timescale, which is closely linked to (but not completely in sync with) Co-ordinated Universal Time (or UTC). And to allow GPS receivers to give users the precise time according to UTC, the precise value of the current offset between the two clocks is broadcast by the satellite system. While UTC i...

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