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Galileo to Bring Additional Services

Despite continuing delays in its introduction, when the new European Union funded Galileo constellation goes live in 2014 it will provide a number of novel services. Designers of next-generation Multi-GNSS systems need to factor in these new capabilities in order to keep their equipment ahead of the competition.

Importantly, Galileo is designed provide more precise location data from that provided by GPS or GLONASS, and will be accurate down to the one-meter range. The data will also include accurate altitude measurements, and improved coverage services at high latitudes. Crucial to this, each of the 27 live satellites in the constellation will broadcast no fewer then ten different navigation signals, enabling a degree of service differentiation not yet seen from any other satellite system.

Galileo will offer five main services when fully operational. The standard “free-to-air” Open Service, the high-integrity Public Regulated Service and the Search and Rescue Service are scheduled to be fully operational by 2014. At this point, trials will also begin on the remaining two services: a value-added centimeter-accurate Commercial Service and an open Safety Of Life Navigation Service for applications where guaranteed accuracy is essential.

Clearly, without the necessary satellites in place—and indeed even when they are—GNSS receiver designers need a proper means of testing their products, and this comes in the form of the Spirent family of Multi-GNSS simulators. These acclaimed test tools already have the certified capability of simulating Galileo navigation signals, both alone and in combination with GPS and Glonass signals.

With early adopters likely to pay a premium for the ability to access the new Galileo services, manufacturers cannot afford to be late with their support for the Galileo system. And that means simulating the signals now well in advance of the 2014 launch.

 

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